Vintage Clothing article: Sydney Morning Herald

Photo by Jon Reid, Sydney Morning Herald

I am absolutely delighted for my dressmaking teacher that the Sydney Morning Herald decided to do a story on the rising popularity of dressmaking in a vintage style. I’m sure there are many dressmakers and many sewing teachers out there in Sydney but I doubt any of them could rival Bev. As she says to me, if I re-told half the stories she’d told me, or some of the things I’ve seen her do and say, no one would believe me. To top it off she’s an excellent teacher. Some people teach you how to do something. Bev teaches you why and that I think is much more valuable as you can learn to adapt it. Best of all, she knows my likes and dislikes so well that if I come to her with a pattern – vintage or otherwise – and a concept; if she thinks it will look awful, she’ll tell me! I’ve watched her be diplomatic with other students. It’s only us lucky long term ‘permanent fixture’ students who get the warts and all version.

Lastly – because I know Isobel will say it – I’m not looking at the camera because we were instructed to pretend the photographer wasn’t there.

Related Links:

http://busybeesewing.com.au/ 

SMH Article: These Dedicated followers have vintage fashion all sewn up

Advertisements

Posted on April 16, 2012, in 1940s, Dressmaking, Fashion, Sewing, Vintage Clothing and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. I wonder if you could scan an old pattern and rescale it using software, then print it out to use.

    • A good suggestion although unlikely to solve some of the fitting issues as it’s not just a matter of people in 2012 being heavier than they were in the 1940s. We are taller as well, so lengthening the pattern is something you need do. Both my grandmothers were barely 5ft tall. I’m 5 ft 7″ and that makes a big difference.

  2. I don’t know whether to be proud at the hon mensh, or embarrassed that I seem so predictable!
    Actually, I am far happier you are looking at the machine. An early (painful) memory is of the needle from my mother’s electric Singer sewing machine going through my finger.
    She looks very stern, and you look like the young apprentice.
    Now I want more pix of the background. It looks amazing!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: